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Tag Archives: GAPS Diet

Coconut Risotto

This was so easy and something totally different for us.  I admit the photo is really lacking but the flavor was very good.

It all started this morning when I was shopping for coconut oil.  I was contemplating whether or not I wanted to include any more coconut flakes in my order.  And then I slowed down a bit to read about the various cuts of the flakes and all of a sudden this jumped out at me… “about the size of white rice”!

Like many of you, rice was a staple in our home and some recipes are just not the same without it.  And while I have found cabbage to be a good rice replacement, there are some things that it is not right for.  So I got to thinking about ways to use coconut like rice.   The thought of making risotto popped into my mind.

This is what I did.  I put about a cup of coconut in the bottom of my pan and covered it with water.  Then I added a chopped onion, and a stalk of celery.  On top of this I placed 5 chicken legs and covered the pan.  I let this simmer until the chicken was done.
When the chicken was finished, I removed the chicken and put the rest of the contents of the pan into the blender and blended it up until it was creamy.  I then returned this to the pan, added sliced mushroom and about  a 1/3 cup of Parmesan cheese and a splash of white wine. It was a little thick so I added a splash of kefir to it.  I let this rest on warm until the mushrooms were cooked.

I served this with the chicken, mustard greens, and carrots.  It was a great meal!  I am very excited about the results of this.  I plan to research other risotto recipes and see what kind of modifications I can come up with.

So while this will not be as cheap as rice, it will make a nice variation from time to time.

Buon Appetito!

 
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Posted by on November 8, 2012 in Coconut Risotto

 

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The Lowly Meatloaf

Meatloaf is very economical, easy to make, can be made up in advance and frozen then reheated, and is VERY GAPS/SCD approved.  AND the combinations for making one are as endless as the stuff you like and keep in your kitchen.  The history of the meatloaf goes back into ancient history but it probably rose to stardom during the 1940’s during the war years.  Food rations existed and budgets were still being kept due to the hard depressions years that came before the war.  Women needed to make every penny count and nothing was wasted or overlooked.  Let’s face it GAPS/SCD can be a budgeting nightmare at times for those families that are doing this as a whole.  My primary focus with this blog was to encourage others to look around their kitchens and to be creative with what you have on hand, with what you can afford, and to do the best you can with what you have.

I believe the meatloaf is one such idea.  The diversity is incredible whether you start with a cheap package of frozen turkey, or use an $10 pound of buffalo meat.  Your starter is ground meat (poultry, pork, or beef), your fillers are what you have on hand and you must use at least one egg per pound.

The meatloaf I made today probably cost me a total of $1.50 to make. I used a package of ground turkey I bought on sale for $1, I added in one egg, a shredded carrot, and some leftover spinach.  Oh yes, and onion is essential.  I will top it with a layer of Swiss cheese and offer some cucumber ketchup I made with honey.

I could have used coconut or almond flour as a filler but since I am serving some coconut flour bread with it I did not want the added roughage (the nut flours do not totally agree with everyone in my family.)  Also, meatloaf is a place where we can pack in more veggies. You can put just about any type of veggie into a meatloaf.  Squash would work but we are not limited to eating squash all the time. If you do not grow your own or if you do not have a cheap outlet for them, they can begin to add up quickly in cost.

These diets are all about maximum nutrition and we need to be packing as much variety as possible into what we are making.  As an exercise in planning a pound of ground meat can be mixed with smushed peas, ground up green beans, grated carrots, radishes or rutabaga, cooked and drained frozen spinach or kale (or chopped up fresh), shredded cabbage (this is becoming my rice replacement), cooked and drained eggplant, chopped tomatoes, green peppers, lots of onions, and of course squash of any variety (winter or summer).  You could also add fruits.  It is just a matter of finding combinations that you like and have on hand.  If you are consuming nut flours with no problems, adding in a spoonful or two of these will make the meatloaf even bigger and denser for added volume for more mouths.

So whether you are feeding a large family or just one, the meatloaf is versatile with a lot of benefits like being made up in advance, easy, and filling.  So the next time you face a “something different moment” or want to plan for freezer meals, remember the lowly meatloaf.

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Posted by on October 30, 2012 in Beef, Green Beans, Helpful Tips, Spinach, Squash

 

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What to do with Eggplant

Eggplant is a good GAPS/SCD food if it is tolerated.  It is high in fiber and very versatile.  I make a side dish out of it by cooking it with tomatoes, onions and peppers.  As a fusion food, it can be spiced up to go with about any main entree.  For Italian flavor add the Italian herbs such as oregano and basil and of course a lot of garlic.   For Mexican meat add cumin, garlic, hot peppers and paprika. And if you want to make it taste Asian try adding a touch of honey, some toasted sesame oil and fresh parsley.

Eggplant can be added to soups. Cube up the eggplant, add ground meat, onions, tomatoes, peppers, carrots, and stew it.  Add your favorite seasonings.

One of our favorites is eggplant mini- pizzas.  You cut eggplant rounds brush with olive oil and top with your favorite toppings.  Bake.

Also you can cut eggplant into lasagna noodles and make it up like a regular lasagna.  It helps to fry the eggplant in a bit of olive oil before placing it into your baking dish. Layer it with ground meat, sauce and cheese.

I usually soak the eggplant in salt water for about and hour before cooking it. The soaking releases the bitter enzyme that resides in the fruit.  After soaking I rinse and then allow to drain for a couple of minutes.

If Eggplant is not part of your regular food regiment, and if you can tolerate it, consider including it to your GAPS list.  There are all kinds of eggplant recipes on the internet, many of them are gaps friendly and others easily converted to GAPS.

 

 

 
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Posted by on October 12, 2012 in Crock Pot, Eggplant, pizza, Soup

 

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A New Squash Casserole

Or at least for us it was a new squash casserole.  For years I have made a squash lasagna and I will write that one up eventually but last night I was thinking about ways to make a simpler meal.  I had asked my daughter to cook supper and she is still in the learning stage…so I wanted to make it easy for her to do.

These are the instructions that I gave her:

Shred the squash in the food processor and put it in the colander to drain…squeeze it out after it sits for a few minutes.  Dump it into a bowl and add a couple of eggs, and a enough coconut flour to thicken it just a bit.

While the squash are draining season the tomato sauce to taste Italian.  (Basil, oregano, garlic, and fennel-but not too much or daddy will tell us he does not like it.)

Put the squash in a greased baking dish. (350)  Put on a layer of cheese and then the tomato sauce.  When it is done in about 30 minutes put on another layer of cheese.

Oh yes, do not forget the salt and pepper where it is needed.

It came out delightfully good for a first try.  We all thought hamburger or bacon would have been good in it and it would have been included except…search as we might, we could not find any without a trip to town which was not going to happen.   But even without the added meat this was a really tasty and fulfilling supper.

 

 
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Posted by on August 1, 2012 in Squash

 

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Coconut Beef with Shitake Mushrooms

Coconut Beef with Shitake Mushrooms

This is one of my families favorite beef recipes.  I have made it for years…It is all GAPS/SCD approved.  And it is simple to prepare.

Take a beef roast and brown it. Place it in a roasting dish (I just use my iron skillet that I browned the meat in).  Pour over coconut milk. (Either from an approved source or make your own by blending up water and coconut until you get a consistency you can live with. For today, I settled for a coarse coconut milk.)  Pour this over the meat…sprinkle with salt and black pepper, toss in some crushed garlic.  To this I add several dried shitake mushrooms, making sure they are down in the coconut milk. The dried shitake mushrooms give it a destinctive flavor but regular button mushrooms can be used. 

Cover your baking dish and put this in the oven. Bake at about 300 for two hours or until the meat is tender.  Today, I removed the meat from the coconut/meat drippings in the pan and added in onion with some fresh parsley, a splash of white wine and cooked it down until the onions were tender.  After pouring this over the roast I rushed it off to the table to be consumed with glee.  We particularly like this served with green beans, and today black olives were a must. 

Another simple and quick to prepare meal.   The recipe idea works just as well with chicken.

 
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Posted by on June 22, 2012 in Beef

 

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Chicken and Mexican Cabbage

Chicken and Mexican Cabbage

I’ve got some little guys that I am quite fond of that used to come to my house before SCD and I always made them chicken and rice. It delighted me to no end to see them consume the entire large pan full.

They too are on the GAPS/SCD diet now and so I decided to attempt to make something similar in flavor so I can again treat these little men when they come to my house.  My first attempt at this was not successful, I confess it tasted like cabbage.  So today I tried again…

I started with part of a head of cabbage, cooked it slowly in lard and some coconut oil.  As I cooked the cabbage I added in some dried green pepper chunks (I would have used fresh except I was out) and a small onion.   I cooked the cabbage until tender and then drizzled in some annatto oil (annatto seeds soaked in olive oil), this gave the cabbage a yellow color and is what  the Latin Americans use to yellow their rice.  (Saffron is expensive and few places make true yellow rice with saffron) 

Okay, once I got the color just about right, I added salt, cumin, paprika.  It didn’t taste quite like I wanted (perhaps too much cumin)  So I decided to add a light drizzle of honey and a about 3 tbsp of tomato sauce.  I simmered this together, wondered if I dare add in the crushed garlic and decided that everything is better with garlic!  So I added two.  And I was right, the garlic, tomato, and honey just went together perfectly.    So my creative juices, decided this was actually going to turn out tasting similar to Mexican rice so I tossed in some dried jalapeno pieces just for fun.

I am happy to say that this experiment turned out very good.  I served this with some baked beans , avocado with onion, and salsa.   No, not like the former rice dish that I made but certainly not bad!  For those that like Mexican rice this is pretty close.  I would not be ashamed to feed this to my little friends.

 
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Posted by on May 31, 2012 in Cabbage, Chicken

 

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Salmon Salad

I planned to do several things today that required the use of my kitchen so for lunch I wanted something fast and simple to put together.  Since it has been several days since we have had fish, I settled on a can of Salmon. 

I made some wonderful mayo last night out of half coconut oil and half walnut oil.  So for my salad, I drained the liquid off of the salmon (reserved to be used later on) added in enough mayo to moisten the fish, a couple of scallions (but any sweet onion chopped up will do nicely), and that was it.   Quick, easy and ready.  I intended to add celery but I forgot.

I served this with some GAPS/SCD bread and some carrots sticks.  On the side, I offered some homemade hot mustard which accompanied it all very well.

GAPS/SCD does not have to be hard and complicated.  Even if you include the time it took to make the mayonaise last night and the mustard several days ago the whole time frame for this meal was less than 20 minutes.

 
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Posted by on May 30, 2012 in Condiments, Fish, Salad

 

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Lactose Fermented Kimchi

There is always something brewing in my kitchen.  This week it is Kimchi, pickles, grape leaves, and a catmint (not catnip) tincture.  There was also a pot of tea but I omitted it from the photo.

If you haven’t tried fermented Kimchi I am here to encourage you.  When you make it you can control the level of heat that you put into it.  I like it mildly hot but one daughter likes it best without the heat so I make it mild and then sprinkle on extra cayenne pepper when I want it.

Kimchi is made out of a nappa cabbage, a head of bok choy, a small daikon radish (but you can use regular salad radishes), 3 or 4 scallions, a 2 inch chunk of ginger root peeled and grated, 2 or 3 cloves of garlic.   Oh yes, and I add 2-3 carrots!!  You can omit any of these ingredients but for the best tasting Kimchi use them all.   And if you like hot food add in some dried hot peppers, and if you don’t like hot food skip them completely.  Kimchi is just as good without the heat.

I chop my nappa cabbage and bok choy up coarsely.  Small enough that it will pack in jars comfortably but not shredded like for sauerkraut.   After I get every thing chopped up I add 1 TBSP of sea salt (sometimes more if the heads of cabbage and bok choy were large) and 4-6 TBSP of kefir or yogurt whey.  And before I stir it all up I take my paparika shaker and give it all a generous sprinkling of paparika.  This will give the Kimchi that good red color and enhances the flavor.

After I get everything in the bowl, I toss it all together and allow the bowl to set for an hour or so.  This is not necessary but I have found allowing my kraut and kimchi to sit in the bowl for a little while helps the packing process.  The salt begins the break down process which makes for easier transfer from bowl to jars. 

I pack the Kimchi into the jars, packing the ingredients down with a wooden spoon until the juice rises above the contents.   Fill the jar giving yourself about an inch of head space.  I set the jars in the little plastic boxes that mushrooms come in to catch any overflow of brine.  The kimchi sets out for three days before I transfer it to the fridge.  

I often eat Kimchi with a splash of Braggs Amino Acids.  Out of all of the fermented foods that I make Kimchi is probably my most favorite.   So if you have only made sauerkraut, you might want to give Kimchi a try!!

 
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Posted by on May 30, 2012 in Cabbage, Fermented Foods

 

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Baked Coconut Cod

When I was kid, my dad was a commercial fisherman.  I grew up eating the cream of the ocean and to this day love good quality fish. Unfortunately, I do not live near a good fish market and I am limited to what I can find at my local supermarket.

Most cheaper grade of fish are best battered and fried.  GAPS/SCD limit us in being able to fry foods like fish.  I got to thinking about ways to oven fry…and remembered a while back that I oven fried chicken livers with some success.   So I decided to try this with my package of cod.

I dipped the pieces of cod into an egg wash and then rolled them in a seasoned coconut flour mixture (seasoning was garlic, salt, black pepper, paprika, and thyme).  After placing them on a greased cookie sheet I baked the coconut floured fish in a 350 oven about 15 minutes or until the breading is golden brown. (timing will vary depending on the thickness of the pieces.

I served this with carrot soup, some freshly made Kimchi, and spinach cooked with mushrooms and onions.

A fast and easy meal to prepare.  So if you miss fried fish try this oven version!

 
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Posted by on May 16, 2012 in Fish

 

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Roast Beef with Butternut Gravy

It is pretty much agreed that gravy goes well over pot roast.  So today, I took the time to plan the meal with gravy.  Since the GAPS/SCD diets do not allow flour or cornstarch one has to take another approach to making gravy.   This then means that gravy cannot be an afterthought but something we have to plan.

There are all kinds of suggestions for making gravy using blended veggies.  And really any veggie will work.   I had extra butternut squash cut up and ready to use in my refrigerator so I tossed that in with my roast, carrots, and mushrooms before baking my in the oven.

After the roast was done, I took the butternut squash out of the roasting pan and smashed them up with a fork.  I added about a cup of broth and a package of plain gelatine. (Blending it all together well.)   In a skillet, I placed three or four tablespoons of coconut oil and fried two onions until tender.  Once done, I stirred in the smashed up squash, added salt , pepper, and garlic to taste.   For a smoother gravy (or for people who do not like the texture) the onion could have been blended as well.

I cut up the roast and placed it in a serving dish, then added the other veggies from the roasting pan.  I poured this wonderful gravy over the top.

Because winter squash do not have a lot of flavor they make a great binding agent for gravy.   I have used zucchini’s before and found that they changed the flavor a little more than I liked.  I have also made gravy with coconut flour.  It tastes fine but I really don’t like the gritty texture.

So the next time you want something with gravy, take the few extra minutes to make one with a blended vegetable.

 
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Posted by on April 23, 2012 in Beef, Cooking Helps, Gravy, Helpful Tips, Squash

 

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