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Category Archives: Beef

Hamburger Lindstrom

I have recently been moving bookshelves around and was flipping through some cookbooks.  Many recipes can quickly be made GAPS friendly by swapping out an ingredient or two.

I am also trying to incorporate more diversity in my meals.  My main goal is to find ways to stretch my grass-fed meat budget.

The other morning as I was flipping through a cookbook I came across this recipe which I have converted to make it 100% GAPS legal.    We all were delighted with how this tasted.

1 lb of ground meat

1 cup of beets

2 eggs

a splash of apple cider vinegar

1 tsp of dill weed

salt and pepper

about a 1/4 cup of coconut flour (perhaps less)

and of course salt and pepper

I put the beets in the food processor and ground them up. Then I tossed in everything but the coconut flour.  I ground it up and then added in flour until it was a good texture for frying

Before serving I topped with yogurt cheese that I had mixed with dill weed.   (yogurt cheese is like cream cheese)

I admit that I had some reservations about this recipe but I am so glad that I did not pass it over.  It was truly fabulous.  So if you are trying to get more veggies into your diet, this recipe is a winner.  It works out to be about half meat and half veggies.  But the addition of eggs and the cheese keeps the protein levels up.

I used a very lean ground beef so it cooked out no fat, making these burgers good eaten cold or chopped up in a salad.

 
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Posted by on November 24, 2013 in Beef, Beets, Cheese

 

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Chopped Liver (Pate)

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Liver is one of those things that most people either love or hate. I have one daughter that likes it prepared as chopped liver better than any other way. Most chopped liver recipes call for chicken liver and that is very good. But today, I made it with grass fed beef liver.

First I fried the liver in a good amount of coconut oil, browning it on both sides and cooking it until it was completely done but not overdone. (Putting a lid on the frying pan to let it steam a bit.)

I then removed it from the skillet and added in a couple of onions and fried them up in the juices in the skillet. Cooking them until they were tender. The more traditional recipes will tell you to boil the liver, but I personally do not see that it makes any difference in the taste, if anything, I think gently frying it improves the flavor.

I tossed all of this into the food processor and ground it up until it was smooth. I added in yogurt to moisten it up a bit. But on another day, I might add butter, beef or chicken fat, or even more coconut oil. Then I sprinkled in salt and pepper to taste, a couple cloves or garlic and ground it up a bit more.

It is simple and fast to make. Like most everything I make, there are ways to vary the original recipe. I have made it with raw sweet onions ground into it. I have put boiled eggs in it. I have not tried it with avocado but thinking I might next time.

The liver is then served with some GAPS legal bread, or used as a veggie dip. We have even been known to eat it a top a bowl of salad.

 
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Posted by on April 29, 2013 in Beef, Liver

 

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The Lowly Meatloaf

Meatloaf is very economical, easy to make, can be made up in advance and frozen then reheated, and is VERY GAPS/SCD approved.  AND the combinations for making one are as endless as the stuff you like and keep in your kitchen.  The history of the meatloaf goes back into ancient history but it probably rose to stardom during the 1940’s during the war years.  Food rations existed and budgets were still being kept due to the hard depressions years that came before the war.  Women needed to make every penny count and nothing was wasted or overlooked.  Let’s face it GAPS/SCD can be a budgeting nightmare at times for those families that are doing this as a whole.  My primary focus with this blog was to encourage others to look around their kitchens and to be creative with what you have on hand, with what you can afford, and to do the best you can with what you have.

I believe the meatloaf is one such idea.  The diversity is incredible whether you start with a cheap package of frozen turkey, or use an $10 pound of buffalo meat.  Your starter is ground meat (poultry, pork, or beef), your fillers are what you have on hand and you must use at least one egg per pound.

The meatloaf I made today probably cost me a total of $1.50 to make. I used a package of ground turkey I bought on sale for $1, I added in one egg, a shredded carrot, and some leftover spinach.  Oh yes, and onion is essential.  I will top it with a layer of Swiss cheese and offer some cucumber ketchup I made with honey.

I could have used coconut or almond flour as a filler but since I am serving some coconut flour bread with it I did not want the added roughage (the nut flours do not totally agree with everyone in my family.)  Also, meatloaf is a place where we can pack in more veggies. You can put just about any type of veggie into a meatloaf.  Squash would work but we are not limited to eating squash all the time. If you do not grow your own or if you do not have a cheap outlet for them, they can begin to add up quickly in cost.

These diets are all about maximum nutrition and we need to be packing as much variety as possible into what we are making.  As an exercise in planning a pound of ground meat can be mixed with smushed peas, ground up green beans, grated carrots, radishes or rutabaga, cooked and drained frozen spinach or kale (or chopped up fresh), shredded cabbage (this is becoming my rice replacement), cooked and drained eggplant, chopped tomatoes, green peppers, lots of onions, and of course squash of any variety (winter or summer).  You could also add fruits.  It is just a matter of finding combinations that you like and have on hand.  If you are consuming nut flours with no problems, adding in a spoonful or two of these will make the meatloaf even bigger and denser for added volume for more mouths.

So whether you are feeding a large family or just one, the meatloaf is versatile with a lot of benefits like being made up in advance, easy, and filling.  So the next time you face a “something different moment” or want to plan for freezer meals, remember the lowly meatloaf.

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Posted by on October 30, 2012 in Beef, Green Beans, Helpful Tips, Spinach, Squash

 

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Coconut Beef with Shitake Mushrooms

Coconut Beef with Shitake Mushrooms

This is one of my families favorite beef recipes.  I have made it for years…It is all GAPS/SCD approved.  And it is simple to prepare.

Take a beef roast and brown it. Place it in a roasting dish (I just use my iron skillet that I browned the meat in).  Pour over coconut milk. (Either from an approved source or make your own by blending up water and coconut until you get a consistency you can live with. For today, I settled for a coarse coconut milk.)  Pour this over the meat…sprinkle with salt and black pepper, toss in some crushed garlic.  To this I add several dried shitake mushrooms, making sure they are down in the coconut milk. The dried shitake mushrooms give it a destinctive flavor but regular button mushrooms can be used. 

Cover your baking dish and put this in the oven. Bake at about 300 for two hours or until the meat is tender.  Today, I removed the meat from the coconut/meat drippings in the pan and added in onion with some fresh parsley, a splash of white wine and cooked it down until the onions were tender.  After pouring this over the roast I rushed it off to the table to be consumed with glee.  We particularly like this served with green beans, and today black olives were a must. 

Another simple and quick to prepare meal.   The recipe idea works just as well with chicken.

 
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Posted by on June 22, 2012 in Beef

 

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Roast Beef with Butternut Gravy

It is pretty much agreed that gravy goes well over pot roast.  So today, I took the time to plan the meal with gravy.  Since the GAPS/SCD diets do not allow flour or cornstarch one has to take another approach to making gravy.   This then means that gravy cannot be an afterthought but something we have to plan.

There are all kinds of suggestions for making gravy using blended veggies.  And really any veggie will work.   I had extra butternut squash cut up and ready to use in my refrigerator so I tossed that in with my roast, carrots, and mushrooms before baking my in the oven.

After the roast was done, I took the butternut squash out of the roasting pan and smashed them up with a fork.  I added about a cup of broth and a package of plain gelatine. (Blending it all together well.)   In a skillet, I placed three or four tablespoons of coconut oil and fried two onions until tender.  Once done, I stirred in the smashed up squash, added salt , pepper, and garlic to taste.   For a smoother gravy (or for people who do not like the texture) the onion could have been blended as well.

I cut up the roast and placed it in a serving dish, then added the other veggies from the roasting pan.  I poured this wonderful gravy over the top.

Because winter squash do not have a lot of flavor they make a great binding agent for gravy.   I have used zucchini’s before and found that they changed the flavor a little more than I liked.  I have also made gravy with coconut flour.  It tastes fine but I really don’t like the gritty texture.

So the next time you want something with gravy, take the few extra minutes to make one with a blended vegetable.

 
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Posted by on April 23, 2012 in Beef, Cooking Helps, Gravy, Helpful Tips, Squash

 

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Beef with Red Cabbage, Onions, and Mushrooms

 

This was another day that I found myself with a small pot roast cooked over night in the crock pot and no real plans for what to do with it.  Some of you know that in addition to my family, I also make sure that my father-in-law gets fed twice daily.  On many days I literally cook four meals instead of two. The goal for him is proper nutrition and quantity.  Dear Ole Dad (DoD), needs to feed before noon so often I fix his small meal and then move on to ours after I send a daughter out the door to take Grandaddy his.  Dear Old Dad can be a bit of a stinker about feeding.  He is not picky but one has to be very careful about rotating the things he likes in a way that keeps him interested in eating.

So it was one of those mornings when I looked at the clock and realized that I needed to quickly come up with an idea for Dad’s lunch.  He is very fond of red cabbage, onions, and mushrooms.  And since he grew up on a ranch and has been a rancher his whole life, beef is always a favorite.

So I sauteed, until very tender, onion, red cabbage, and mushrooms in a liberal amount of coconut oil, butter, and olive oil.  When it was done I salted it well and added garlic powder (DoD’s favorite seasoning combination) along with black pepper.  This was so good I decided that I would fix the same thing for our lunch.

After the cabbage, onions, and mushrooms were cooked down I served it with sliced pot roast and some navy beans which complimented well.

As an aside, recently I have learned something about cooking my meat in the crock pot overnight (perhaps I am still a novice with the crock pot…)  I have found that if I put my meat in the crock pot frozen the night before and turn it on low that the meat does not get over cooked and tough.  Instead it comes out with a tender texture and one that is more enjoyable.

 
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Posted by on March 29, 2012 in Beef, Cabbage, Crock Pot

 

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Butternut and Beef Curry

Today at lunch, I was again faced with this meat from the broth pot and no idea what I was going to do with it.  One daughter suggested soup again.  After two days of very fine tasting soups I didn’t think any of us (except her) would want soup again… She suggested that I do something curry like.  (She once spent an entire summer mastering the art of curry making.)

Before GAPS, curry always meant something with rice or a flat bread.  So when I think of curry I have to rethink it, attempting to capture the flavors we love in a way that suits our current dietary needs.  Recently, I have begun to try to get more fiber into our diet.  (One of those stopping to evaluate what we need to tweak moments…)

Also, as you could guess by now, I do not cook from a menu but use what I have on hand.  This usually means the meats I pick up on sale, the veggies I get for a good price, or stuff that I grew myself.   I had a bumper crop of winter squash this year and we are still just making a dent in the pile.  So after very little thought, I decided that butternut squash would make a fine thicken agent for my curry.

I am trying to incorporate a bit more palm oil into our diets (good source of Vit E) so I started with a palm, coconut, butter, and seasame oil blend.  I tossed in one small sized squash cut up in fairly small pieces.  Along with this I added a small onion, about a quarter of a green pepper (I did not want this to be on overpowering flavor) and a handful of sliced mushrooms.  I let this cook for a few minutes until the squash was done.   Then I added in the meat and about a cup of broth.  Next came the spices: salt, pepper, 1/4 tsp of powdered ginger, a good dash of paprika, and a couple good dashes of curry powder.   I let it all simmer for a few minutes and called the family to lunch.

I told them that I felt like lunch was not going to be very exciting and suggested that the “curry” would probably be good with the French Cream that I put on the table.  I hadn’t eaten any yet when one daughter piped up with “this is good!”, and quickly the other two concurred.  I put a little French Cream on mine and when I tasted it I was surprised at how good it was.

Don’t you love it when a meal comes together better than you expected?

 
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Posted by on March 6, 2012 in Beef, Meat Leftovers, Squash

 

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